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oxfordwords (Oxford Dictionaries)

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@oxfordwords
9h Ago
The origin of the word 'penguin' is still debated, but may have come from the Welsh 'pen gwyn', meaning 'white head' 🐧 #WorldPenguinDay https://t.co/douFWwKrBF
35 Favorites 21 Retweets
@oxfordwords
10h Ago
RT @OUPAcademic: Will the International Spelling Congress be able to provide an alternative to the current unpredictable spelling system? h…
0 Favorites 8 Retweets
@oxfordwords
10h Ago
Have you ever noticed that many of our swear words sound very much like German ones and not at all like French ones? https://t.co/W6gbNaE0xF
71 Favorites 35 Retweets
@oxfordwords
13h Ago
In Italian, to say something is 'like cabbages for a snack' (entrarci come i cavoli a merenda) is to say it is out of place. https://t.co/KBYuTNWQiE
65 Favorites 41 Retweets
@oxfordwords
14h Ago
You might assume that the ‘positive’ verb or adjective tends to precede its opposite. One must 'do' before one can 'undo', surely? Well, not always... https://t.co/DtvcxvRbvC
23 Favorites 21 Retweets
@oxfordwords
14h Ago
RT @TeachingEnglish: 31 commonly confused words to watch out for, in this blog from @OxfordWords. How many confuse you? Could you use it wi…
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@oxfordwords
16h Ago
BBC News - Narrow vocabulary 'hits pupils' grades' https://t.co/6ZccLjDyQc
33 Favorites 23 Retweets
@oxfordwords
18h Ago
Word of the Day: obumbrate https://t.co/t8aZs68REG https://t.co/xXLBgXJTQn
129 Favorites 78 Retweets
@oxfordwords
1d Ago
Today, a dilemma is generally a ‘difficult situation or problem’. Historically, however, 'dilemma' names a much more specific challenge. https://t.co/V5nfCLu838
23 Favorites 13 Retweets
@oxfordwords
1d Ago
The UK's sterling pound, is colloquially called a quid - but why is that? Well, for the origin of this monetary moniker, we really shouldn’t be asking why as much as what. https://t.co/JB9QAMe5aL
22 Favorites 24 Retweets
@oxfordwords
1d Ago
'The hat was hung'; 'the jury was hung'; but 'the man was hanged'. How has this come to be the case? https://t.co/A9dtoayRCU
39 Favorites 23 Retweets
@oxfordwords
1d Ago
RT @mrsrachelingram: @thfc_cockerel @HaggardHawks Pan call comes from 'panne', French for breakdown. See article I wrote for Oxford @Oxford
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@oxfordwords
1d Ago
RT @HaggardHawks: The word PANIC derives from Pan, the Greek god of the woods. It originally referred to the unexplained sounds that might…
0 Favorites 194 Retweets
@oxfordwords
1d Ago
Interested in the origin of this idiom? Find out why we 'bury the hatchet' (and, indeed, what a hatchet is) in this blog post! ->https://t.co/5f1AmvaHTn https://t.co/2lL8MbBwca
24 Favorites 16 Retweets
@oxfordwords
1d Ago
Hold the front pages, literally. https://t.co/mVqEz3Cqt2
40 Favorites 20 Retweets
@oxfordwords
1d Ago
Word of the Day: nomenclature https://t.co/eOtqbmtVaQ https://t.co/fn3j2cR13T
105 Favorites 53 Retweets
@oxfordwords
2d Ago
'Tis better to have lorn and lost than never to have lorn at all. Or something. https://t.co/YGaU4ZQV7r
25 Favorites 12 Retweets
@oxfordwords
2d Ago
RT @LearnEnglish_BC: Today is #ShakespeareDay! How well do you know Shakespeare's plays? Take this quiz from @OxfordWords and let us know y…
0 Favorites 21 Retweets
@oxfordwords
2d Ago
How well do you know the language of the Bard? A Shakespeare quiz for #ShakespearesBirthday (probably): https://t.co/jjNH2ZNEsJ
27 Favorites 24 Retweets
@oxfordwords
2d Ago
RT @OED: On the anniversary of Shakespeare’s death (and possibly birth), a reminder that the OED quotes from his grave inscription to illus…
0 Favorites 60 Retweets
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